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Lit Crit: Milk and Honey

I didn’t know what to expect from this book, other than that I had read and followed the author, Rupi Kaur, on her Tumblr page and enjoyed her prose. Aesthetic wise, I love the cover, which I know is cliché and has nothing to do with the contents of the book, but the matte black cover with bumblebees provides me with more happiness than should be warranted from a book cover. The book, Milk and Honey, is broken down into four parts: The Hurting, The Loving, The Breaking, and The Healing. My favorite parts were The Loving and The Breaking, probably because all my writing originates from either falling in love or reeling from a heartbreak. The Hurting mainly focused on the dysfunction of families and The Healing highlighted femininity and female empowerment. I didn't hate those sections but the raw and carnal emotion from losing love really speaks to me and I found those poems to be the most influential.

I love prose books because they are quick reads and take you through an entire person’s range of emotions in usually under an hour or less. The shortness and bluntness of her poetry was refreshing and I loved the images posted on many of the pages. Unfortunately, it took me a little while to warm up to this book. The Hurting section was a little disappointing to me and I believe the least moving moment of the book, which is unfortunate because it is the first section. If this book were not so widely acclaimed and a NY bestseller, I might have put the book down at that point. I couldn’t connect to the author and found her poetry to be a bit immature in that first section. I’m very glad I continued to read because I loved the next two sections, so much so that I wish her book was simply The Loving and The Breaking sections.


I definitely enjoyed the majority of the book and would recommend it but I have read other poetry books I found to be more moving and influential. I’m not sure I would have picked this book up if I hadn’t read so much praise for it, however for the parts I did enjoy, I’m very happy I did delve more into it. I look forward to seeing how Rupi develops and matures as a writer and what her next book will be.


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